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5 Strange Cat Behaviours Explained

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5 Strange Cat Behaviours Explained

  1. Spontaneous sprinting – While house cats are domesticated they still have the same energy of wild cats. So don’t be surprised by a spontaneous burst of energy. This is a way of getting exercise and releasing pent up energy. A good solution would be to ensure your cat gets tons of physical activity by playing with them or letting them outside if the circumstances allow it.
  2. Rubbing against you – Okay, admittedly this one isn’t actually that weird, but the explanation is pretty cool. Your cat rubs up against you to mark you as theirs! When rubbing against you they release pheromones leaving their distinct scent on you. This is a sign of acceptance and pride in ownership, as cats probably see you as their human just as you see them as your cat.
  3. Stuttering meow – This is the noise a cat makes when they are hunting prey, also described as chirping or chattering. You’ve probably seen this before when your cat is staring down some little bug in a hard to reach place, with their tail twitching back and forth and ears alert and pointed. So why do they do this and what does this mean? The short answer is that we simply do not know the full explanation. It is clear however that this is a behaviour associated with hunting, and is possibly linked to frustration at not being able to reach the prey. One theory is that they are mimicking the actions of their “kill bite”, or the movements they would make with their jaw while killing their prey. Kind of sinister for something that looks and sounds so ridiculous.
  4. Kneading their paws – This is a behaviour left over from kittenhood, when a kitten kneads its paws against their mother while drinking milk. In adulthood this is a sign of relaxation, trust and happiness and is usually accompanied by a purr.
  5. Charging at you sideways – It’s a strange sight to behold when your cat runs toward you sideways, usually with ears back, back arched and legs stiff. In the wild this behaviour is meant to threaten an opponent by making the cat look bigger and more menacing. This could be done out of self-defence or fright. In a comfortable domestic setting however, this is most likely just play. Cats often practice their defense and attack skills on us through play by chasing, boxing, fighting and stalking. They also do this among each other, especially when are just kittens playing and learning these necessary life skills.